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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of surgical anatomy of the long saphenous vein. found in the catalog.

surgical anatomy of the long saphenous vein.

Gerard Malmuire Glass

surgical anatomy of the long saphenous vein.

by Gerard Malmuire Glass

  • 157 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.D.)--TheQueen"s University of Belfast, 1957.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 v
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19927579M

  Vein stripping is used to remove or tie off a large vein in the leg called the superficial saphenous vein. This helps treat varicose veins. Vein stripping usually takes about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. You may receive either: General anesthesia, in which you will be asleep and unable to feel pain.   The veins are arranged in a dorsal venous arch. The medial side drains into the long saphenous vein; the lateral side drains into the short saphenous vein. Superficial veins, of course, must be on the dorsum of the foot, because they would collapse under the force of ordinary weight bearing if they were on the sole.

The long saphenous vein ascends from the dorsum of the foot, in front of the inner malleolus, along the inside of the leg to the posterior aspect of the internal condyle of the femur, where it is in relation to the long saphenous nerve of the anterior crural. Thence it runs upwards and outwards to the saphenous opening, pierces the cribriform. Generally, when the origin of the word saphenous is discussed, most affirm that the term derives from the Greek word safaina, which means “evident.” The ancient Greeks knew only the caudal portion of the vein, and neither the Greeks nor the Romans used the term saphena. In fact, the term first appeared in the writings of Avicenna. In contrast, the term saphenous is derived from the Arabic.

62 Aydın Kurt et al A rare anatomical variation of the greater saphenous vein. Case report. eration, including many different modifications, remains a principal surgical procedure today [8]. Familiarity with the anatomy of this tributary network, termed by Bruska.   The Vein Book. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press; Dwerryhouse S, Davies B, Harradine K, Earnshaw JJ. Stripping the long saphenous vein reduces the rate of reoperation for recurrent varicose veins: five-year results of a randomized .


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Surgical anatomy of the long saphenous vein by Gerard Malmuire Glass Download PDF EPUB FB2

The long saphenous vein is the longest superficial vein in man. It arises anterior to the anterior edge of the medial malleolus (first constant anatomical landmark). It has a linear course in the leg.

It ascends vertically, posterior to the medial border of the tibia. The great saphenous vein (GSV, alternately " long saphenous vein "; / səˈfiːnəs /) is a large, subcutaneous, superficial vein of the leg.

It is the longest vein in the body, running along the length of the lower limb, returning blood from the foot, leg and thigh to the deep femoral vein at the femoral to: femoral vein. The surface anatomy of the anterior leg compartment has focused its attention on the saphenous vein (SV), neglecting the saphenous nerve (SN).

The SV is frequently used as a graft during vascular bypass procedures. During harvest of the SV, the most important relationship that the surgeon must pay attention to is with the by: The great saphenous vein originates from the dorsal vein of the hallux, which merges with the dorsal venous arch of the foot.

The vein then runs anterior to the medial malleolus (a relatively easy area to locate the vein). The vein ascends up the medial surface of the leg, and then runs posterior to the medial epicondyle of the femur.

During harvest of the saphenous vein (SV), the most important relationship to take into account is the saphenous nerve (SN) to avoid pain and paresthesias after surgery. Surgical Anatomy of the Saphenous Nerve - The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. A possible function is ascribed to the long saphenous vein and an argument against its stripping in varicose veins presented.

Abnormality of the long saphenous vein and its association with varicose veins is described. Particular features of the saphenous tributaries are noted and their relevance in varicosity discussed. In the surgical literature, most of the information available on saphenous vein anatomy has been accumulated from studies that were specifically made to define the anatomic basis of venous insufficiency in the lower extremities but in which little emphasis has been placed on the applied anatomy of the saphenous vein for bypass purposes.

The great saphenous vein is the longest vein in the body that originates near medial malleolus and goes up to the level of groin skin crease. blood from the foot, leg, and thigh to the deep femoral vein at the femoral triangle. It is referred to as the greater or long saphenous vein.

The standard accepted term now is great saphenous vein. As diagnostic and therapeutic options for venous disorders expanded, the nomenclature proposed in by the International Interdisciplinary Committee 1 required revision.

The nomenclature was extended and further refined, 2 taking into account recent improvements in ultrasound and clinical surgical anatomy. The term great saphenous vein should be used instead of terms such as long saphenous.

There are three modifications of the fascia lata, one of which is the saphenous opening. The saphenous opening is an oval aperture located in the fascia lata to allow the passage of the great saphenous vein.

This article will discuss the anatomy of this structure followed by any relevant clinical notes on the topic. Long saphenous vein is the most common conduit utilized for surgical coronary revascularization.

Ultrasound-assisted vein assessment is superior to traditional clinical examination of the long saphenous vein in discerning path and suitability for use as a conduit. The great saphenous vein (also known as long saphenous vein, latin: vena saphena magna) is a large superficial, subcutaneous vein of the leg.

The great saphenous vein originates from the union of the dorsal vein of the great toe and dorsal venous network of the foot, more precisely, from the medial marginal vein. The great saphenous vein ascends along the medial side of the lower leg together. The proximal end of the saphenous vein was divided and double-ligated, including a single transfixing suture, approximately at the ascending branch or as proximal as possible after every proximal branch, if any, was divided.

All surgical wounds were closed by subcuticular suturing. A practical atlas of functional anatomy "Classical" anatomy of the long saphenous vein Clinical anatomy Surgical anatomy Phlebographic anatomy Ultrasonographic anatomy Endoscopic anatomy The saphenofemoral junction Ectatic junction Duplicated junction Plexiform junction H-shaped junction Tributaries of cutaneous drainage Saphenopelvic.

The long saphenous vein, which is still largely utilised for CABG, is rarely assessed prior to surgical harvesting.

This lack of preoperative information about the anatomy and quality of the vein can lead to unnecessary incisions, significant soft tissue trauma, formation of tissue flaps that eventually can lead to significant wound morbidity.

Using transillumination, it is possible to mark the exact position of the long saphenous vein directly. The nerve lies just posterior, separated from the vein by only a thin layer of subcutaneous fat at this level.

An arc of potential injury can be accurately drawn for suture placement through an accurately placed transverse incision. This helical movement is further emphasized by elongation of the varicose vein. The valves are not distributed homogeneously. In the thigh, the long saphenous vein is usually devoid of valves.

Only one or two of the dozen valves of the long saphenous vein are situated above the knee, while the majority of veins are situated distally, in the calf. The long saphenous vein (LSV) has been the most popular conduit for cardiac surgeons performing coronary artery bypass surgery.

The traditional method of open dissection based on surface landmarks can result in morbidity (bleeding, infection, wound complications). Fig 3 Areas of distribution for the (A) small saphenous vein (SSV), (B) sural nerve (SN), and (C) overlap in area of distribution shown on a computer-assisted surgical anatomy mapping (CASAM)-generated image depicting an average leg in which the SSV and the SN of all 20 legs were warped.

Yellow dots: landmarks used for CASAM. At the ankle, the distances from the SN to the tibialis anterior tendon (TAT) and the long saphenous vein (LSV) were recorded. Results In 24 specimens, a SN was present at the ankle, and in 19 specimens extended to the foot.

Thermal damage to peripheral nerves is a known complication of endovenous thermal ablation (EVA) of the small saphenous vein (SSV). Therefore, the main objective of this anatomic study was to define a safe zone in the lower leg where EVA of the SSV can be performed safely.The veins that have been discussed, together with their corresponding regions, are: internal jugular vein, carotid triangle (p.

13); subclavian vein, sternocleidomastoid region (p. 13); axillary vein, axillary region (p. 19); inferior vena cava, renal veins, and variations, discussed in the section on the retroperitoneum (p.

19); iliac veins.A library with videos, books, slide sets on anatomy, epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatments, surgical techniques.

Links to a selection of articles, practical applications, and to relevant websites on venous diseases. "Classical" anatomy of the long saphenous vein Clinical anatomy Surgical anatomy Phlebographic anatomy.